Ushabti of Ramesses IV

Painted wood ushabti ‘funerary figurine’ of the king Ramesses IV. Funerary figurines, known as “ Ushabtis” by the Egyptians (which means “those who answer”) are viewed as typical ancient Egypt objects. They represent the deceased in the form of a mummy in osirifide position. The figure’s name, headdress, and any hand-held accessories are the only way to know whether the ushabti represents a king or a commoner. 

They appeared during the Middle Kingdom and were then produced until the end of the Egyptian dynasties. They did, however, originate with royalty. A funerary text was often written the body of the ushabtis, indicating the statuette’s purpose. It comes from the Book of the Coming Forth by Day, more commonly known as the Book of the Dead, a collection of spells concerning the deceased and his life after death in eternity. 

Ushabti of Ramesses IV
Ushabti of Ramesses IV

It calls on the deceased’s double, represented by the figurine, to take the deceased’s place and perform certain tasks, including agricultural jobs, which may be demanded of him in the afterlife.

New Kingdom, Ramesside Period, 20th Dynasty, ca. 1189-1077 BC. From Thebes. Wood and paint, height: 32.5 cm (12.7 in). Now in the Louvre, Paris. N 438 Room 323