Coffin of Takhebkhenem, Lady of the House, daughter of Pedikhons

Coffin of Takhebkhenem, Lady of the House, daughter of Pedikhons
Coffin of Takhebkhenem, Lady of the House, daughter of Pedikhons
British Museum. EA6691

This coffin, belonging to a woman called Takhebkhenem, is made of wood, with polychrome painted decoration. The British Museum notes that, “the vignettes, which are executed in a very conservative style, show the deceased carrying a sistrum before Osiris, her mummy on a bier, and a strange hawk-headed kneeling figure, described as Osiris, there is a ram-headed vulture, crowned with a solar disc, on the breast, with protective falcon beneath.”

Coffin of Takhebkhenem, Lady of the House, daughter of Pedikhons
Coffin of Takhebkhenem, Lady of the House, daughter of Pedikhons
British Museum. EA6691

Takhebkhenem, was the daughter of man called Pedikhons, and she lived in the Late Period of Dynastic Ancient Egypt. She held the title, “Lady of the House”. “Lady of the House” or “nbt-pr”, was a common title for women in Ancient Egypt. Wives, daughters, grandmothers or any type of female relative tended to share this title.

nbt (“lady”) +‎ pr (“house”) in a direct genitive construction, thus ‘lady of the house’.

Inside the coffin lid is the goddess Nut. Nut, representing the night sky, the goddess of the stars, is usually depicted upon the inside of coffin lids, in order to protect the deceased. She literally arches over the body of the deceased, therefore, she is often painted face-on, a rather unusual thing for Egyptian 2-dimensional art, however, when you think of how she will be arching over the dead, her body facing us full frontal makes absolute artistic and functional sense.

Goddess Nut inside the coffin lid of Takhebkhenem, Lady of the House, daughter of Pedikhons
British Museum. EA6691

Summary:

Wooden coffin of Takhebkhenem, Lady of the House, daughter of Pedikhons, with polychrome painted decoration
Late Period, c. 713–332 B.C.
From Thebes
Now on display at the British Museum. EA6691