Third Intermediate Period

Golden Ram's-head Amulet

Golden Ram’s-head Amulet

This golden Ram’s-head amulet was probably made for a necklace worn by one of the Kushite kings. Representations show these pharaohs wearing a ram’s-head amulet tied around the neck on a thick cord, the ends of which fall forward over the shoulders. Sometimes a smaller ram’s head is attached to each end. Rams were associated...

Kushite King

This bronze statuette depicts a king of Kushite origin who ruled Egypt during the 25th Dynasty of the Third Intermediate Period. The Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXV, alternatively 25th Dynasty or Dynasty 25), also known as the Nubian Dynasty, the Kushite Empire, or the Napatans after their city Napata, was Egypt’s final dynasty...

Sphinx of Taharqa

Taharqa, also spelled Taharka or Taharqo (Egyptian: 饟嚳饟墧饟儹饟垘 t隃rwq, Akkadian: Tar-qu-煤, Hebrew: 转执旨专职讛指拽指讛, Modern: T墨rhaqa, Tiberian: T墨rh膩q膩, Manetho’s Tarakos, Strabo’s Tearco), was a Nubian king of the 25th Egyptian Dynasty rulers of the Kingdom of Kush, c.747鈥656 B.C. The Sphinx of Taharqa is a granite gneiss statue of a sphinx with the face of Taharqa....

Faience Wadjet Eye Amulet

Faience Wadjet Eye Amulet

Wadjet eye amulets were among the most popular amulets of ancient Egypt. The wadjet eye represents the healed eye of the god Horus and embodies healing power as well as regeneration and protection in general. The faience eye here is an intriguing combination of the regular wadjet eye with a wing, two uraei, and a...

Ta-Reti

This cartonnage coffin belongs to a woman called Tanetreti-Scherit or “Ta-Reti”, and she was an Ancient Egyptian “Chantress of Amun”, somewhere between, 1070-713 B.C. Ta-reti came from a family of priests and singers or “Chantresses“. Her father was a man named Ankhpakhered (whose title is upon her coffin), who held the title of “Gatekeeper of...

Kneeling Statue of Osorkon III

Kneeling Statue of Osorkon III

The statue depicting king Osorkon III kneeling and pushing a barque of Seker, red color on headdress and kilt, possibly an undercoat for gilding, now lost. Osorkon III ruled during the 8th century BC as part of the 23rd Dynasty. He was known for his military campaigns and efforts to restore stability to the kingdom...

Takabuti is the most famous Ancient Egyptian icon in Ireland. She has been on display at the Ulster Museum for over a century.

Takabuti

Takabuti was a young Theban woman who died in her twenties or early thirties towards the end of Ancient Egypt鈥檚 25th Dynasty, c. 755-656 B.C. The daughter of a Priest of Amun named Nespara and a woman named Tasenirit, Takabuti is believed to have been a married woman who lived and died in Thebes. She...

Wooden figure of a woman playing a harp

Wooden figure of a woman playing a harp

This wooden painted figure of a woman playing a harp, dates from the Third Intermediate Period, c.1070-664 B.C. She stands 26cm tall and 6.5cm wide, and currently resides in the British Museum. Music played a very important part in ancient Egyptian life. From all periods there are scenes in temples and tombs showing musicians playing....

Hathor suckling the Kushite Queen Nefrukakashta

Hathor suckling the Kushite Queen Nefrukakashta

Gilded silver amulet shows the Kushite Queen Nefrukakashta being embraced and nursed by a goddess, probably Hathor.Nubian, Napatan Period, reign of Piankhy (Piye), c. 743鈥712 B.C.From el-Kurru, Ku 52 (tomb of Queen Nefrukekashta)Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 24.928 The goddess wears the vulture headdress and a crown consisting of a diadem with bovine horns and...

Shrine Amulet. British Museum. EA59402

Shrine Amulet

Green glazed steatite amulet in the form of a naos or a shrine. A naos (Greek 谓伪蠈蟼 “temple, shrine”) is the descriptive name given to Egyptian hieroglyph Gardiner O18 (see below). Within the inner shrine, an aegis of a leonine (lion) goddess remains. Each side of the shrine is decorated with representations of the leonine...