Sculpture

In ancient Egypt, statuary played a significant role in their culture and religious practices. Statues were commonly used to depict gods and goddesses, kings and queens, and other important figures. These sculptures were often made from various materials such as stone, wood, or metal. They were crafted with great attention to detail and were believed to house the spirit like ‘ka statues‘, or essence of the depicted individual. Statues were placed in temples, tombs, and other sacred places, serving as a focal point for worship and offering a physical representation of the divine. The art of statuary in ancient Egypt reflected their beliefs, rituals, and societal hierarchy.

Nefertiti Statue

This limestone striding figure of Nefertiti was unearthed in the archaeological remnants of the sculptor Thutmose’s workshop, within the remains of the same room (Amarna House P 47.02. Room 19) where the famous bust of the queen was discovered in 1912 by Ludwig Borchardt, at Tel el-Amarna. The figure was discovered in several fragments and...

Nebseni & Baket

This family portrait features Nebseni, chief of the royal stables alongside his wife Baket, and their son named Imen, whose face has sadly been destroyed, but it appears the boy stands before an altar. Finely carved from limestone, the piece measures at 87cm tall and 35cm wide, with a depth of 33.5cm. It was discovered...

Kushite King

This bronze statuette depicts a king of Kushite origin who ruled Egypt during the 25th Dynasty of the Third Intermediate Period. The Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt (notated Dynasty XXV, alternatively 25th Dynasty or Dynasty 25), also known as the Nubian Dynasty, the Kushite Empire, or the Napatans after their city Napata, was Egypt’s final dynasty...

Sphinx of Taharqa

Taharqa, also spelled Taharka or Taharqo (Egyptian: 饟嚳饟墧饟儹饟垘 t隃rwq, Akkadian: Tar-qu-煤, Hebrew: 转执旨专职讛指拽指讛, Modern: T墨rhaqa, Tiberian: T墨rh膩q膩, Manetho’s Tarakos, Strabo’s Tearco), was a Nubian king of the 25th Egyptian Dynasty rulers of the Kingdom of Kush, c.747鈥656 B.C. The Sphinx of Taharqa is a granite gneiss statue of a sphinx with the face of Taharqa....

Sandstone painted statue of Nefertiti seemingly holding offering tray

Sandstone statue of Nefertiti

Thie painted sandstone of Nefertiti, found besides a statue of her husband king Akhenaten in the same pose, depicts an offering scene and stands at 73.5cm tall. Now both headless, the statue of Nefertiti was found fragmented at the waist. Neferiti wears a pleated linen dress, remnants of a usekh collar can be seen upon...

Female Acrobat

This limestone statuette of a female in an arched position dates from the Middle Kingdom and was discovered within Tomb D303, at Abydos. The tomb is associated with a man named Sa-Inher. The woman is archived as an acrobat due to the pose, however, it is also quite likely she was a dancer. Perhaps she...

Ramesses II and Offering Table

Ramesses II and Offering Table

This limestone statue, which stands at 171cm tall, depicts the 19th Dynasty king, Ramesses II, knelt before a hes-vase shaped offering platform, whilst the king himself holds an offering tray. The bottom has been restored onto a modern platform, but the rest of the statue is in remarkable condition. Ramesses II can be seen wearing...

Rose granite Amenhotep III

Measuring at just under 20cm tall (19.1cm), this rose, or red granite head depicts the 18th Dynasty king Amenhotep III and dates from approximately 1390 -1352 B.C. Currently on display at the Louvre in Paris, unfortunately, not much else is documented about the piece. After ascending the throne as a teenager, Amenhotep III ruled for...

Plaster face of a man, possibly Ay

This face of a man was discovered within the remnants of the Sculptor Thutmoses’s workshop in Tel el-Amarna. Although unnamed, some scholars propose it may be the face of Ay, who is also thought to be a brother of Queen Tiye and was definitely king after the death of king Tutankhamun. This association of Ay...

Plaster Amarna Royal

This plaster head depicts an Amarna royal, likely a king, and based upon resemblance it is even more likely to be a casting of king Akhenaten. The head is life-size, and measures at 20.5cm long, and 14.5cm wide, with a 13cm depth. If the head is of king Akhenaten, it could be from early in...