Ramesses II

Pectoral bearing the name of Ramesses II

Pectoral bearing the name of Ramesses II

The pectoral bearing the throne name of Ramesses II written in a cartouche above what is already a dense composition. Two djed pillars fill in the lower corners of the rectangular frame; they symbolize stability and the rebirth of Osiris. Nekhbet and Wadjet, goddesses of Upper and Lower Egypt, stand side by side within the...

Colossus of Ramesses II at Memphis, 1897

Colossus of Ramesses II at Memphis, 1897

The Colossus of Ramesses II is an enormous statue carved in limestone. It is about 10m (33.8 ft) long, even though it has no feet, and is located near the village of Mit Rahina (Memphis). The statue was found in 1820 by an Italian traveler Giovanni Battista Caviglia. The colossus is an incredible piece of...

Statue of King Ramesses II

Statue of Ramesses II

In this statue King Ramesses II appears in the Blue Khepresh Crown or war helmet, grasping the heqa scepter. The sculpture is world renowned as the Turin masterpiece portrait of Egypt’s longest reigning and most famous king. Breaking with traditional royal portraits, the great general wears a long full robe that is asymmetrically draped to...

Triad of Ramesses II with Amun and Mut

Triad of Ramesses II

Pink granite triad statue depicting king Ramesses II seated between the god Amun and the goddess Mut represented with the attributes of the goddess Hathor. The king, at the center of the divine embrace, replaces the son of the two gods, Khonsu, to form the Theban triad. In ancient Egyptian the verb “to embrace” was...

Mummy of King Ramesses II

Mummy of Ramesses II

The mummy of King Ramesses II was among those found in the Royal Cachette (DB320) at Deir el-Bahari. It was completely covered with linen bandages that bear the king’s name and epithets in Hieratic script. The mummy has silky hair, which was white at the time of death, but has yellowed from the preservative chemicals....

The Kadesh Treaty (Hittite version)

Battle of Kadesh

In one of the world’s largest chariot battles, fought beside the Orontes River, King Ramesses II sought to wrest Syria from the Hittites and recapture the Hittite-held city of Kadesh. There was a day of carnage as some 5,000 chariots charged into the fray, but no outright victor.  The Kadesh Treaty (Hittite version), early cuneiform...

Khopesh sword with the cartouche of Ramesses II

A bronze Khopesh sword inscribed with the cartouches of King Ramesses II. The Khopesh is an Egyptian sickle-sword that evolved from battle axes. The blunted edge of the weapon’s tip also served as an effective bludgeon, as well as a hook. This Khopesh sword is made of bronze with a typical length of 57.5 cm....

Bust of Ramesses II

Bust of Ramesses II

This bust of Ramesses II closely resembles a statue of Ramesses in the Egyptian Museum of Turin. However, the Cairo piece wears a long wig, rather than the Blue Khepresh Crown worn by the Turin statue (Cat. 1380). A uraeus can be seen at the king’s forehead, and he is shown with a young face, and...

Oven of King Ramesses II

Oven of King Ramesses II

Among the precious artifacts in the royal tomb of Psusennes I at Tanis, a bronze brazier, or oven, belonging to Ramesses II was found. It might have been an important object deposited in a palace or a temple in the vicinity of Tanis, or at Thebes. It was taken to Tanis as a sacred artifact...

Relief of Ramesses II Smiting his Enemies

This block is decorated with a traditional scene representing King Ramesses II smiting his enemies. He wears a complete, elegant costume; the Blue Crown adorned with the uraeus, the collar called Usekh or Wesekh, an elaborate garment, two armlets, two bracelets and sandals. He holds, in his left hand, three prisoners by their hair while...