Priestess

Statuettes of Amenhotep and Rannai

Wooden statuettes of Amenhotep and Rannai

This pair of statuettes are of the Theban priest Amenhotep and his wife Rannai, who was a Singer of Amun at the Theban Temple.Made of precious black ebony wood (Egyptian: hbny), these figures stand 44 and 33 cm high, with glass inlay and gold trim. The couple both stand in the famous striding pose with...

Vulture Headdress Inlay

Vulture Headdress

This inlay of a vulture headdress is said to have been discovered among the Treasure of Dendara, and dates from the Ptolemaic Period, c. 100 – 1 B.C., and is made from gold and over 100 semi-precious stones. Thin plates of over 100 perfectly cut precious stones were cut to make this delicate piece. The...

Detail of the Coffin of Priestess Iawttayesheret

Coffin of Priestess Iawttayesheret

This is the coffin lid of a woman named, Iawttayesheret (also known as Tayesheret), who lived during Egypt’s 25th Dynasty, c. 722-655 B.C. Iawttayesheret was the daughter of Padikhnum and Tadiaset. Iawttayesheret held the title of The Divine Adoratrice of Amun, which was a title given to those secondary to the God’s Wife of Amun....

Chantress of Amun-Ra, Tentosorkon

Chantress of Amun-Ra, Tentosorkon

Lady of the House; Chantress of Amun-Ra, Tentosorkon, as appearing in her Papyrus (Book of the Dead), discovered in Thebes. c. 945 B.C. British Museum. EA9919,2 The name means ‘The (female) servant of Osorkon’. Tentosorkon (That of Sorkon), a name of Libyan origin which appeared around the 21st dynasty in the Delta, and was popularised...

Bust of a Priestess of Hathor

Bust of a Priestess of Hathor

This bust is just a fragment of a statue of a Priestess of Hathor from the New Kingdom in Egypt. The priestess served the Egyptian cow goddess Hathor who unlike many other gods and goddesses had both male and female servants. Egyptian priests were meant to serve the gods and with this responsibility many of...

The sarcophagus of Sha-Amun-en-su.

Coffin of Priestess Sha-Amun-en-su

Sha-Amun-en-su was an Ancient Egyptian ritualistic singer and priestess of Amun at the Temple of Karnak. Her name translates to “Fertile Fields of Amun”, and she died around 750 B.C. Sha-Amun-en-su lived during the Twenty-second Dynasty of Egypt (Bubastite Dynasty), where the kings ruled from the city of Bubastis (“House of Bast“, Ancient Egyptian: “Per-Bast“)....

Coffin of Pa-di-tu-Amun. Christies, 2019.

Coffin of Pa-di-tu-Amun

Although the coffin belongs to an Ancient Egyptian man named Pa-Di-Tu-Amun, the coffin lid was originally made for a female priestess, with the titles “mistress of the house, chantress of [Amun]”. The feminine quality of the art is still noticeable. Acquired in Egypt during the 1920s, by the Swedish scientist Olof Vilhelm Arrhenius, this Third...

Sarcophagus lid of Tjentwerethequa

Sarcophagus lid of Tjentwerethequa, “Priestess of Amun”

Sarcophagus lid of Tjentwerethequa, “Priestess of Amun” Third Intermediate period, Early 22nd Dynasty, c. 1000- 901 B.C. It is believed, Tjentwerethequa’s grandson, a senior priest of Amun-Re named Iufenamun, was of the priesthood responsible for the reburial of the old kings into the secret caches, which hid the past rulers of Ancient Egypt away from...

Group Statue of Seneb and His Family

Group Statue of Seneb and His Family

Seneb was a dwarf who served as a high-ranking court official in the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt, circa 2520 BC. Despite his diminutive size, Seneb was a person of considerable importance and wealth who owned thousands of cattle, held twenty palace and religious titles and was married to a high-ranking priestess of average size...

Book of the Dead of Nestanebetisheru

Book of the Dead of Nestanebetisheru

Vignette from Book of the Dead of Nestanebetisheru; frame 87. Full page black line vignette of Geb, Nut and Shu with three registers either side of adoring ancient Egyptian gatekeepers, ba’s and deities including Thoth. Every figure has an accompanying hieroglyphic label written in black ink. Geb is shown as a semi-recumbent figure stretching out...