Painting

Faiyum portrait of a woman

Faiyum portrait of a woman

This Faiyum portrait of a young woman dates from around 100-200 A.D., and depicts an Egyptian woman with hair tied back in a bun and styled in ringlets, wearing a dusty pink and rust tunic, with thick eyebrows, and baretta earrings. She has a slight Mona-Lisa smile as she gazes ahead. These portraits, known as...

Paneb

Paneb was a chief of the Theban workers of Deir el-Medina, who is infamous for the numerous allegations against him including; debauchery, bribery, theft (including royal stone and objects from tombs), sexual assault and violence. The Papyrus Salt 124 (also known as the British Museum Papyrus 10055) (Museum number EA10055) presents the numerous charges against...

Inherkhau and son Kenna

Inherkhau and son Kenna

This colourful fragment comes from the tomb of the foreman Inherkhau (TT359), at Deir el-Medina. Inherkhau held the title, “Foreman of the Lord of the Two Lands in the Place of Truth“, and worked under the reigns of king Ramesses III and Ramesses IV. The piece shows Inherkhau alongside his son Kenna. Kenna is noticed...

Facsimile of a wall painting from the Tomb of Nakht (TT52). Nina De Garis Davies (1881-1965).

Cat eating fish under a chair

This charming image of a cat eating a fish whilst sat under the chair of a woman named Tawy, is depicted on the Western wall, southern side, within the 18th Dynasty tomb of Tawy’s husband named Nakht (TT52). The image has been documented in a facsimile by the artist Nina De Garis Davis, with all...

Portrait of a woman, from Faiyum

Portrait of a woman, from Faiyum

The portrait was found by the archaeologist Albert Gayet during the excavation campaign of 1904 or 1905 at the necropolis of Antinoopolis in Middle Egypt. It entered the Louvre’s collections in 1905. A fragment of the right side of the board has been reglued. The paint has worn away on the nose, leaving a dark...

Nubian dancing girl

Nubian dancing girl

A wall painting of a Nubian dancing girl appears in the procession of tribute for king Thutmose IV (Tomb of Horemheb, TT78). This scene is depicted within the Tomb of Horemheb, not the later king with the same name, but an Official of King Thutmose IV. Horemheb held many titles, including; “Great Confidant of the...

Mummy board painting of two brothers from Faiyum. Egyptian, Roman Period c. 30 B.C. - 2nd Century A.D.

Mummy board painting of two brothers from Faiyum, c. 30 B.C. – 2nd Century A.D.

These mummy board painting of two brothers, commonly known as ‘Faiyum Portraits’ due to being found in the town of Faiyum, were realistic portraits placed over the mummified dead. It is thought that perhaps they show the deceased at their best, possibly even portraits hung in houses previously to death. However, that is not certified,...

Fragment of Wall Painting from the Tomb of the Dancers

Fragment of Painting from Tomb of the Dancers

In this fragment painting from the Tomb of the Dancers, the girls are performing to the accompaniment of of clapping and finger-snapping, under the supervision of two male overseers. The occasion is perhaps a festival dance in honor of Hathor, goddess of music and dancing and also protector of the tombs of Western Thebes. “The...

The Opening of the Mouth Ceremony on the deceased King. Scene from the Burial Chamber of Tutankhamun

Opening of the Mouth Ceremony of Tutankhamun

This scene is unique in its nature. We never witnessed an heir or a successor performing the ritual of the Opening of the Mouth Ceremony on the deceased King. The scene from the north wall of the burial chamber in the Tomb of Tutankhamun shows the brown “freckling” of the paintings that may have resulted...

Anubis before embalmed Amennakht

Anubis before embalmed Amennakht

A priest wearing the mask of Anubis completes the mummification of Amennakht. On both sides of the bed, where the mummy lie, is depicted the goddesses Isis and Nephthys. The damage on the wall, shows where the coffin was placed. Detail of a wall painting depicts Anubis before embalmed Amennakht, from Tomb of the Servant...