New Kingdom

Meryt wife of the Mayor of Thebes Sennefer

Meryt, wife of the “Mayor of the Southern City (Thebes)”, Sennefer, as depicted within his tomb, TT96 (“Tomb of the Vineyards”).New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, reign of Amenhotep II, c.1439-1413 B.C.Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, Theban Necropolis.

Blue glazed ushabti of Seti I

This head of a ushabti represents king Seti I of Ancient Egypt’s 19th Dynasty, c. 1294-1279 B.C and was discovered within the king’s tomb. The head measures at 5.77cm tall and 7.75cm wide. A composition of blue glaze, this head of Seti I showcases the king wearing the Ancient Egyptian “nemes” stripped royal headdress. The...

Plaster face of an elder

This plaster face of an elderly face was discovered in Tel el-Amarna, the location of king Akhenaten’s experimental capital city of Akhetaten. Within this city was discovered a workshop belonging to the “king’s favourite” sculptor, a man by the name of Thutmose. It was of the remnants of this workshop where the world-famous, objectively breathtaking...

Tomb of Neferhotep, Scribe of Amun

On Sunday February 11th, 2024, the Tomb of Neferhotep (TT49) at Al-Khokha (Luxor’s West Bank), was opened to the public.Neferhotep was a Scribe of Amun in the 18th Dynasty, c. 1550-1292 B.C. Since the collapse of the Ancient Egyptian empire, the tomb of Neferhotep had been used for storing cattle and even as housing. When...

Inlay of a princess

Inlay face of a princess, possibly Meritaten, made from opaque turquoise-blue glassNew Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1351–1334 B.C.Tel el-Amarna.British Museum. EA54264 Meritaten, also spelled Merytaten, Meritaton or Meryetaten (Ancient Egyptian: mrii.t-itn), was an ancient Egyptian royal woman of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt. Her name means “She who is beloved of Aten“; Aten being the...

Isis of Coptos

This statue known as, “Isis of Coptos” is a granodiorite statue of the goddess Isis or Hathor thought to have discovered within the Temple of Min.Coptos is the Greek name for Qift, a city in the Qena Governorate of Egypt about 43 km north of Luxor. In Ancient Egyptian it would have been named “Gbtyw”....

Ancestor Busts

During early excavations of the worker’s village of Deir el-Medina, numerous anthropoid busts of limestone and clay, referred to as “ancestor busts” were found. French Egyptologist Bernard Bruyère (10 November 1879 – 4 December 1971), proposed the idea that these “ancestor busts”, rather than being funerary items or temple tributes, would have actually been a...

Ebony figure of a man, with young boy at side

Standing at 48.30cm, this statuette of a man is carved from ebony and once had inlaid eyes and brows, likely made of glass or semi-precious stone. Upon the side of the striding man is a profile figure of a young boy. The man wears a shoulder-length wig parted in the middle. He is shirtless but...

Kha and Merit receiving offerings from son Nekhetef

This beautiful decorated wooden trunk was discovered within the famous tomb of the foreman Kha and his wife Merit, known as tomb TT8 at Deir el-Medina. Depicted within a painted scene, whose borders are adorned with decorative floral, zigzag and geometric designs, is the married couple Kha and Merit, receiving offerings of food, drink and...

Mummy mask of Satdjehuty

Mummy mask of Satdjehuty

Daughter of king Senakhtenre Ahmose and his wife Tetisheri, Satdjehuty (Daughter of Thoth) was a sister-wife to her brother king Seqenenre Tao and held multiple titles including, “King’s Wife“, “King’s Sister“, and “King’s Daughter“. Sitdjehuti was also the sister of queens Ahhotep I and Ahmose-Inhapy, also sister-wives to their brother king Seqenenre Tao. Sitdjehuty and...