Nefertiti

Bust of Akhenaten

Limestone bust of Akhenaten from Tel el-Amarna (ancient Akhetaten) New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, reign of Akhenaten, c. 1352-1335 B.C. Musée du Louvre. E 11076

Family portrait of Akhenaten, Nefertiti & daughter

Family portrait of Akhenaten, Nefertiti & daughter

Triad family portrait of Akhenaten, Nefertiti and daughter holding handsNew Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1353-1336 B.C. King Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti are believed to have had at least six daughters together. They were: Meritaten, Meketaten, Ankhesenpaaten (who changed her name Ankhesenamun and became the wife of her half brother Tutankhamun), Neferneferuaten Tasherit, Neferneferure, and...

Plaster face of an elder

Plaster face of an elder

This plaster face of an elderly face was discovered in Tell el-Amarna, the location of king Akhenaten’s experimental capital city of Akhetaten. Within this city was discovered a workshop belonging to the “king’s favourite” sculptor, a man by the name of Thutmose. It was of the remnants of this workshop where the world-famous, objectively breathtaking...

Inlay of a princess

Inlay face of a princess, possibly Meritaten, made from opaque turquoise-blue glassNew Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1351–1334 B.C.Tel el-Amarna.British Museum. EA54264 Meritaten, also spelled Merytaten, Meritaton or Meryetaten (Ancient Egyptian: mrii.t-itn), was an ancient Egyptian royal woman of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt. Her name means “She who is beloved of Aten“; Aten being the...

Life-size quartzite head of Nefertiti

Life-size quartzite head of Nefertiti

This life-size quartzite head of Nefertiti was discovered within the remains of the workshop of the Ancient Egyptian sculptor Thutmose at Amarna. Although unmarked, the resemblance to other portraits of Nefertiti identify her clearly. The head is made of quartzite, but has yet to be sanded to create a smooth finish. The face still has...

Nefertiti smiting - talatat. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 63.260

Nefertiti smiting

These talatats (stone fragments) show an Amarna Period scene of Nefertiti within a kiosk upon a royal barge smiting an enemy of Egypt. Usually this pose would be reserved for the king alone, however, as we can see, Nefertiti is clearly depicted in such a position, representing her status at the time of this images’...

Head of Tutankhamun or Ankhesenamun

Head of Tutankhamun or Ankhesenamun

This plaster face, dating from the reign of Akhenaten or shortly after his reign ended, is thought to represent a child of the king. The British Museum, where this face resides, has the face archived, identifying it with the likeness of either Tutankhamun or his sister-wife Ankhesenamun. Ankhesenamun, was one of the six daughters of...

Relief of Two princesses

Two princesses

This talatat depicts two princesses of king Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti. Their youth is represented by the hairstyle Egyptologist’s have dubbed the ‘side lock of youth’, a plaited strand or strands of hair on an otherwise shaven head or short hairstyle. This piece was found among the foundations of the Pylon of Ramesses II...

Sandstone sunken relief of an Amarna woman

Relief of an Amarna Woman

This sandstone sunken relief of a woman dates from the Amarna Period, and it is easy to tell the era she is from due to the style in which she is depicted. The artistic manner is most definitely from the period of Akhenaten’s experimental reign, however, this piece was actually found in Thebes and not...

Parennefer receiving reward in the form of necklaces, from king Akhenaten and Great Royal Wife Nefertiti.

Relief of Parennefer

Parennefer was a close advisor to Prince Amenhotep IV (King Akhenaten), before he became king. Once Amenhotep IV, or rather, King Akhenaten, took the throne, Parennefer served as his personal Royal Butler, and worked closely as a confidant to the king. In the age of Akhenaten, it was Akhenaten who was the representation of Ma’at...