Mummy

Mummies in ancient Egypt were typically placed in elaborate coffins and sarcophagi and buried in tombs, often accompanied by various funerary goods and offerings. The preservation of the body was crucial because ancient Egyptians believed in an afterlife where the soul would need its physical form. Mummies were seen as vessels for the soul to continue its existence in the afterlife.

The Mummy of Thuya

Yuya and Thuya are the parents of Queen Tiye, the beloved Great Royal Wife of king Amenhotep III. The pair were buried at the famous Valley of the Kings, within their tomb known as KV46, which was discovered in February of 1905 by by the British Egyptologist James E. Quibell, during excavations funded by the...

Head of a woman

Head of a woman (momie de femme), discovered at Thebes in 1799. Little is known about the identity of the woman, but she dates from between the New Kingdom Period and Late Period (when the last Native rulers of Ancient Egypt held power), c. 1550–332 B.C. Mummified head of a woman (momie de femme), discovered...

Early Period Skeleton

Human skeleton, likely dating from the 1st Dynasty, buried within a reed basket. Discovered at Tarkhan. This human skeleton of an adult was discovered in Tarkhan, laying in a fetus pose in a cane basket. Tarkhan is an ancient Egyptian necropolis located on the Nile’s west bank, approximately 50 km south of Cairo. Flinders Petrie...

Mummy of Maiherpri

Maiherpri

Measuring at 5’4.75 inches tall, the mummy of Maiherpri showcases a young man of approximately no more than 25-30 years of age. Sadly, little is known about Maiherpri, and the only sources found thus far that give us a little knowledge about him are the titles discovered within his tomb (KV36). Maiherpri’s name translates to...

Mummified skull of Amenhotep III

Mummified skull of Amenhotep III

The mummified skull of Amenhotep III, photographed by Grafton Elliot Smith in 1912. Originally buried in WV22 (Valley of the Kings), Amenhotep III’s mummy was moved in ancient times to Tomb KV35, the tomb of Amenhotep II, which was used by Egyptian priests around the Third Intermediate Period as a royal “mummy” cache (storage). Tomb...

Mummy of Ankhef

Ankhef

Excavated by Dr David George Hogarth, the mummy of a man named Ankhef was discovered in Asyut, Egypt. Asyut Ancient Asyut was the capital of the Thirteenth Nome of Upper, c. 3100 B.C, on the western bank of the Nile. The two most prominent gods of ancient Egyptian Asyut were Anubis and Wepwawet, both funerary...

Takabuti is the most famous Ancient Egyptian icon in Ireland. She has been on display at the Ulster Museum for over a century.

Takabuti

Takabuti was a young Theban woman who died in her twenties or early thirties towards the end of Ancient Egypt’s 25th Dynasty, c. 755-656 B.C. The daughter of a Priest of Amun named Nespara and a woman named Tasenirit, Takabuti is believed to have been a married woman who lived and died in Thebes. She...

Mummy of Nesmin

Mummy of Nesmin

This mummy belongs to a man called Nesmin; his name means “The One Who Belongs to (the god) Min.” He was a priest for Min in Akhmim, and from the inscription on his coffin, it is known that his father Djedhor was a priest as well, and that his mother Tadiaset was a musician for...

A cartonnage mummy mask belonging to a Bearded High Official found in the Asyut Necropolis of Upper Egypt.

Bearded High Official

A cartonnage mummy mask belonging to a High Official found in the Asyut Necropolis of Upper Egypt. The mummy dates from the 11th-12th Dynasty of the Middle Kingdom, c. 2000-1980 B.C. The mask is now on display at The Walters Art Museum. 78.4 Another mummy mask with a similar bearded style was also discovered in...

Mummy of Kharushere

Mummy of Kharushere

Cartonnage shell containing the mummy of Kharushere, who held the office of Doorkeeper of the House of Amun. His parents were the Doorkeeper of the House of Amun, Bes, and the Mistress of the House, Chantress of Amun, Tanetheretib. The outer layer of Kharushere’s mummy consists of a large sheet. It is held in place...