Metropolitan Museum

Cult Image of the God Ptah

Cult Image Statuette of the God Ptah

This statuette depicts Ptah, the chief god of Egypt’s capital city Memphis, who is easy to identify by his tight-fitting cap and enveloping shroud. Other iconographic details, such as the royal beard, the large and detailed broad collar, the scepter of merged “was” and “djed” signs, and a platform representing the hieroglyph for universal order,...

Group of Archers

Relief of a Group of Archers

This fragment of relief of a group of archers shows one of the most elaborately composed scenes preserved from the Old Kingdom. A careful examination reveals parts of at least four archers, three standing and one kneeling below them, his extended left arm and the upper part of his head just visible along the lower...

Ritual Statuette of Thutmose III

Statuette of Thutmose III

Beautifully poised, this small bronze statuette of king Thutmose III offers wine or milk to a god. This figure is the earliest known New Kingdom royal bronze statuette and, with a few Late Middle Kingdom copper and copper-alloy precursors, it initiates the tradition of bronze statuary in Egypt. The fluid, athletic modeling of his body...

Statue of the God Ptah

Statuette of the God Ptah

This statuette of Ptah is remarkable for its beauty and size, state of preservation, elaborate manufacture provisions, and its demonstrable date to the Third Intermediate Period. The great Egyptian god Ptah was a deity whose many aspects include those of both a creator god and a god who listens to individuals’ prayers. Ptah’s name was...

Model of a Soul House

Model of a Soul House

This model from Rifah of the “Soul House” type represents a house with a three-columned portico behind a walled courtyard; in front of the courtyard a libation spout is partly preserved. A stairway on the right gives access to the roof of the house, where an arched opening represents a feature in actual houses through...

Guardian Figure probably Amenemhat II or Senusret II

Wooden Figure wears the red Deshret crown

This figure wears the red Deshret crown of Lower Egypt and the face appears to reflect the features of the reigning king, most probably Amenemhat II or Senusret II. However, the divine kilt suggests that the statuette was not merely a representation of the living ruler. Together with its counterpart wearing the white Hedjet crown...

Arm Panel From a Ceremonial Chair of Thutmose IV

Arm Panel From a Chair of Thutmose IV

This wooden panel is part of the left arm of a throne that belonged to the king Thutmose IV. Traces of glue on the surface suggest that the low relief, with its exquisitely carved details, was once covered with gold foil. On one side, the king is shown as a standing sphinx subduing the enemies...

Two-finger amulet

Two finger Amulet

This two finger amulet depicts stylized human fingers that are about life-size. Two-finger amulets were used exclusively for the dead and were often found on the lower left of the torso. This is the area of the incision that was made during the mummification process in order to remove the internal organs. These amulets were...

Golden Strainer from Bubastis

Golden Strainer from Bubastis

Wine services do not seem to have a long history in Egypt, but appear to have been introduced in the New Kingdom when wine-drinking became a feature of elite society in the Ramesside Period. This gold strainer is intended for a wine service, removing sediment from the beverage as it is poured out of jugs,...

Gold Bes Signet Ring

Gold Bes Signet Ring

This ring bezel is decorated with the royal device of two cartouches topped by ostrich plumes, the cartouches frame dancing figures of Bes. Since Bes was closely associated with women in labor and with small children, the use of his image on this signet ring suggests it belonged to a queen, probably Nefertiti herself. Though...