Meritaten

Inlay of a princess

Inlay face of a princess, possibly Meritaten, made from opaque turquoise-blue glassNew Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1351–1334 B.C.Tel el-Amarna.British Museum. EA54264 Meritaten, also spelled Merytaten, Meritaton or Meryetaten (Ancient Egyptian: mrii.t-itn), was an ancient Egyptian royal woman of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt. Her name means “She who is beloved of Aten“; Aten being the...

Talatat of Kiya usurped by Meritaten

Kiya usurped by Meritaten

This limestone talatat shows a depiction of Queen Kiya, secondary wife of Akhenaten, making an offering of a cone of scented fat to the Aten. It is believed, however, that this piece was later reused and usurped to actually depict Akhenaten’s daughter, with his Great Royal Wife Nefertiti, Meritaten. The reason for this belief is...

Striding girl labelled with the name, “Tama”.

This wooden statuette of a young woman or girl called Tama, dates from the 18th Dynasty and was discovered at Medinet Gurob. Gurob, also known as Ghurab, Medinet Gurob or Kom Medinet Gurob is an archaeological site in Egypt, close to the Faiyum. In the New Kingdom it was the place of a palace and...

Relief of Two princesses

Two princesses

This talatat depicts two princesses of king Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti. Their youth is represented by the hairstyle Egyptologist’s have dubbed the ‘side lock of youth’, a plaited strand or strands of hair on an otherwise shaven head or short hairstyle. This piece was found among the foundations of the Pylon of Ramesses II...

Red Jasper or Porphyry head of Akhenaten

Red Jasper or Porphyry head of Akhenaten

A head of king Akhenaten made from Egyptian jasper or porphyry. This head of Akhenaten is similar to portraits of the king that we believe come from early in his reign. The less exaggerated features of the soon-to-be “Amarna Period”, this serene, slight smile of the young king looks ahead, as he wears the blue...

Amarna Princess Perfume Bottle

Amarna Princess Perfume Bottle

This perfume bottle, with a depiction of an Amarna princess stood upon a lotus blossom, is in the shape of a hes-vase. It is made from Egyptian alabaster, with an inlay of coloured glass, carnelian, obsidian and gold. A hes-vase is named after the “hes” hieroglyph. The hes-vase was used as a libation vessel, meaning,...

Unknown Amarna royal, possibly Tutankhamun or some propose it is the likeness of the mysterious Smenkhkare

Unknown Amarna royal

Sculpture of unknown Amarna royal. New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, Amarna Period, c. 1352-1323 B.C. Discovered in Tel el-Amarna (ancient Akhetaten – king Akhenaten’s experimental new capital), now in the Neues Museum, Berlin. This limestone bust of an Amarna royal has never been officially identified, yet the Neues Museum in Berlin does display it with the...

Head of an Amarnian princess, probably Meritaten. Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 44869

Head of a princess probably Meritaten

This yellow-brown quartzite head of a princess is probably Meritaten, the eldest daughter of Akhenaten. It was excavated by the Deutsche Orient-Gesellschaft in 1912 in a studio of the chief sculptor Thutmose at Tell el-Amarna. The head is from a composite statue where different pieces were sculpted separately and joined together. The skull is elongated...