Isis

Isis of Coptos

This statue known as, “Isis of Coptos” is a granodiorite statue of the goddess Isis or Hathor thought to have discovered within the Temple of Min.Coptos is the Greek name for Qift, a city in the Qena Governorate of Egypt about 43 km north of Luxor. In Ancient Egyptian it would have been named “Gbtyw”....

Amulet of Isis, Horus, and Nephthys

Amulet of Isis, Horus, and Nephthys

According to the myth the sister goddesses Isis and Nepthys cared for the body of Osiris and later they protected his son Horus as a young child. The three deities depicted in this triad amulet are some of the main protagonists in the Osiride myth that tells the murder and revival of the god Osiris...

Statue of Isis of Coptos

Statue of Isis of Coptos

Statue of the goddess Isis, so-called “Isis of Coptos”. She wears a tripartite wig with uraeus. The sun disc and cow’s horns identify the sculpture as Isis or Hathor. Her dress is Egyptian in style and sheath-like in appearance, and around her neck she wears an incised collar of beads.

Osiris with Isis and Nephthys. Book of the Dead of the scribe Hunefer. New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, c. 1300 B.C.British Museum. EA9901,3

Osiris with Isis and Nephthys

Osiris with Isis and NephthysThe Book of the Dead of the scribe HuneferNew Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, c. 1300 B.C.British Museum. EA9901,3 Hunefer was a scribe during the 19th Dynasty (c. 1300 B.C.). He was the owner of the Papyrus of Hunefer, a copy of the funerary Egyptian Book of the Dead, which represents one of the...

Woman with child on lap

Woman with child on lap

This small limestone figurine of a woman holding a male child on her lap is only 4cm in height and dates from around 1550–1450 B.C, making it a product of the 18th Dynasty and New Kingdom era of Ancient Egypt. This little figure is a rather unique piece, as usually the bond between a child...

King Unas being suckled by a goddess

King Unas being suckled by a goddess

Fragment of a relief depicts king Unas being suckled by unidentified goddess. These reliefs are often found in temple complexes and tombs, and they serve as visual representations of the divine nature and legitimacy of the king. The concept of a king being suckled by a goddess is often seen as a metaphorical representation of...

Khonsu-mes receives libation of food and drink from the tree goddess. Papyrus of Khonsu-mes21st Dynasty, c. 1000 B.C.

Tree Goddess

Khonsu-mes receives libation of food and drink from the tree goddess. The tree goddesses are usually associated with the namesake or manifestatiown of the goddesses Hathor, Isis or Nut. Hathor was often referred to as the “Lady of the Sycamore”. The sycamore tree held great significance in ancient Egyptian culture, believed to possess magical and...

Frontal view of the goddess Hathor, depicted as nude

Nude Hathor

This statue of the goddess Hathor was made from Egyptian Terracotta, or Brown Nile Silt, and dates from 400-200 B.C. The Ptolemaic influence in this depiction of Hathor is easy to see, as the statue resembles the soft nude bodies of the female deities of the Mediterranean, such as Hathor and Isis’s Greek counterpart, Aphrodite....

Double seated statuette of Kinebu and Isis

Double seated statuette of Kinebu and Isis

This double seated statute of Kinebu and his wife, a singer for Amun, named Isis (Ancient Egyptian: Aset or Iset), was usurped (reused/recycled) by the pair, and originally dates from the reign of Amenhotep III, c. 1390-1353 B.C. rather than the lifetime of Kinebu and Isis, who lived and died during the reign of Ramesses...

Harpocrates flanked by Isis & Nepthys

Harpocrates flanked by Isis & Nepthys

Sister goddesses, Isis and Nepthys, stand beside and hold hands with Harpocrates, the god of silence, secrets and confidentiality in the Hellenistic religion developed in Ptolemaic Alexandria. Harpocrates stands in the centre, his youthfulness indicated by his nudity and the sidelock of hair worn on his head. He is flanked by Isis and Nephthys. All...