Greco-Roman

Roman funeral shroud of a woman

Roman funeral shroud of a woman

In this beautiful Roman funeral shroud, the woman’s rosy face and large eyes are striking. A long bone or ivory pin holds coils of her hair in place on top of her head, and she holds a small wreath in one hand. Over her abdomen Isis and Nephthys mourn, and over her lower body are...

Coffin for young girl from Akhmim. British Museum. EA29587

Coffin for young girl from Akhmim

Wooden lid and base of a coffin for a young girl from Akhmim, Sohag, Egypt, c. 50 B.C.- 50 A.D. This coffin dates from the period of Greco-Roman rule and can be seen by the garment the young girl is seen depicted wearing. However, despite this she maintains her Egyptian religious belief, by being mummified...

Bronze statuette of Harpocrates

Silver Statuette of Harpocrates

Silver statuette of Harpocrates, with gold chain and ring. The god is shown as a chubby Graeco-Roman Cupid with wings and a heavy garland of fruit and leaves crowning his curly head. The left hand is empty, but the right is raised to the chin. A gold chain with a god ring attached to it...

Mummy of Cleopatra. British Museum. EA6707

Mummy of Cleopatra

This is the mummy of a 17-year-old young woman called Cleopatra, who lived during the Roman Period of Ancient Egypt, c. 100-120. She is cited as the daughter of Candace, a member of the Cornelius Pollius family, the Archon of Thebes, under the rule of Emperor Trajan. The inscriptions state that Cleopatra died at age...

Petamun and Penhorpabik, coffin and coffin lid for the two brothers

Petamun and Penhorpabik, coffin lid for the two brothers

Petamun and Penhorpabik, who lived and died around, c. 175-200 A.D., were young boys who shared the same father, a man named Amenope, but different mothers who are currently unknown. We know they were half brothers’ due to a papyrus scroll accompanying the pair at their burial, which may have been dedicated to the boys...

Statue of Harpocrates. Graeco-Roman, Roman Period, 2nd century AD. From Sidi Bishr, Alexandria. Bibliotheca Alexandrina Antiquities Museum, Alexandria.

Statue of Harpocrates

Marble statue of Harpocrates, who was adapted by the Greeks from the Egyptian child god Horus, represented the newborn sun, rising each day at dawn. Harpocrates meaning “Horus the Child”, was the god of silence, secrets and confidentiality in the Hellenistic religion developed in Ptolemaic Alexandria. In Egyptian mythology, Horus was the child of Isis...

Funeral shroud depicts Anubis and Osiris with the deceased. Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow.

Funeral Shroud of Anubis and Osiris

Funeral shroud depicts Anubis and Osiris with the deceased, from 2nd Century CE Roman Egypt. Greco-Roman mummy cases and shrouds were often painted with images reflecting pharaonic religious beliefs about the hereafter but adapted to suit the prevailing Greco-Roman style.  Egyptian divinities of the afterlife feature prominently, and include some or all of the following:...