Faience

Egyptian Faience Hedgehog Figurine

Egyptian Faience Hedgehog Figurine

Faience hedgehog with a white core and turquoise and black coating. Hedgehog-shaped objects of the most diverse types have been present in Egypt since the Predynastic Period. We find it in jewelry, as an amulet, as a decorative element on the bow of boats, but also in containers for cosmetics. Images of hedgehogs were painted...

Statuette of the god Khnum

Amulet of the god Khnum

Blue-green faience amulet depicting the god Khnum or Amun. In ancient Egypt the ram was revered for its procreative abilities and as a symbol of virility. Its cult has been attested since the beginning of Egyptian civilization. The ram was associated with different deities: Khnum in Elephantine, Amun in Thebes, Herishef in Herakelopolis and Banebdjedet...

Egyptian Faience Statuette of a Hippopotamus

Faience Statuette of a Hippo

This statuette of a hippo was molded in faience, a crushed quartz glazed and fired at a relatively low temperature. Copper salts in the glaze impart the bright blue or blue-green color so characteristic of faience objects. Over the animal’s naturalistic shape, the craftsman painted lily plants that appear as a giant tattoo. Small sculptures...

Amulet of a Papyrus Column

Amulet of a Papyrus Column, Wadj

The Wadj amulet (also known as the papyrus column or scepter) is an Ancient Egyptian amulet in the shape of a papyrus stem. These amulets were made out of turquoise feldspar, as is indicated in the Book of the Dead. This faience amulet represents a papyrus column. Incised lines on the umbel delineate the leaves....

Amulet depicting the goddess Heqet

Amulet of the goddess Heqet

The frog raises its head, while its legs, tense and nervous, are ready to jump. The shiny faience vividly reproduces the moist skin of this amphibian, it was the sacred animal of the goddess Heqet, protector of births. Amulets in the shape of frogs were produced throughout the Pharaonic period and in very different materials....

Aten cartouche

Aten Cartouche Amulet

Amulet in the shape of a cartouche. The glaze is a deep cobalt blue. Two holes at either end enter on the edge and exit on the back of the amulet near the edge. The cartouche is one of the two cartouches used for the Aten and is translated: Ra-Horakhty lives, rejoicing in the horizon....

Wadjet Eye Amulet

Wadjet Eye Amulet

One of the most popular amulets in ancient Egypt, the wadjet eye amulet represents the healed eye of the god Horus. It depicts a combination of a human and a falcon eye, since Horus was often associated with a falcon. Its ancient Egyptian name, wadjet, means “the one that is sound (again).” In Egyptian mythology...

Moulded faience vase in the form of the goddess Taweret

Vase in the form of the goddess Taweret

This Egyptian faience vase is molded in the form of the goddess Taweret, the ancient Egyptian patroness of childbirth and a protector of women and children. Like Bes, she was considered to be a ferocious demon as well as a protective and nurturing deity. She was associated with the lion, the crocodile, and the hippo;...

Egyptian blue faience necklace decorated with wadjet eye

Necklace decorated with wadjet eye

Thirteen separate protective wadjet eye amulets, made from Egyptian faience in molds, decorate this necklace. The most popular of all Egyptian amulets was the wadjet eye, which was worn to promote health and well-being. The mythological origin of this symbol is rooted in the struggle between Horus, who was the rightful heir to the throne...

Marriage Scarab of Amenhotep III and Queen Tiye

Marriage Scarab of Amenhotep III and Tiye

Blue faience scarab, commemorating the marriage of Amenhotep III with Queen Tiye. The inscription on the underside is inlaid with bluish-white glaze. There are additional inscriptions on two sides, under the legs of the beetle – right) name of Queen Tiye; left) throne name of Amenhotep III. Probably sent to dignitaries of Egypt as announcements....