Amenhotep III

Prince Thutmose grinding grain

Prince Thutmose grinding grain

This graywicke figurine showcases the crown prince Thutmose, son of Amenhotep III & his Great Royal Wife, Tiye, grinding grain. The figure dates from around 1390 -1352 B.C., during the reign of his father Amenhotep III. Prince Thutmose served as a priest of Ptah in ancient Memphis. His full royal titles were “Crown Prince, Overseer...

Striding girl labelled with the name, “Tama”.

This wooden statuette of a young woman or girl called Tama, dates from the 18th Dynasty and was discovered at Medinet Gurob. Gurob, also known as Ghurab, Medinet Gurob or Kom Medinet Gurob is an archaeological site in Egypt, close to the Faiyum. In the New Kingdom it was the place of a palace and...

Head of Tutankhamun or Ankhesenamun

Head of Tutankhamun or Ankhesenamun

This plaster face, dating from the reign of Akhenaten or shortly after his reign ended, is thought to represent a child of the king. The British Museum, where this face resides, has the face archived, identifying it with the likeness of either Tutankhamun or his sister-wife Ankhesenamun. Ankhesenamun, was one of the six daughters of...

Pottery fragments, once in the form of a woman holding a basket

Pottery fragments

Pottery fragments, once in the form of a woman holding a basket. Pottery from ancient Egypt are valuable archaeological artifacts that provide insights into the daily life, culture, and craftsmanship of the ancient Egyptians. These fragments can come from various types of pottery vessels, such as bowls, jars, and amphorae, and they can be decorated...

Statuette of Amenhotep III, likely made of wood from Lebanon

Statuette of Amenhotep III, likely made of wood from Lebanon

At just 26.3 cm tall, this statuette of king Amenhotep III, is a treasure of the Brooklyn Museum in New York, and for obvious reason. The Brooklyn Museum’s website states that it is unsure whether the statue is made from ebony or yew wood, however, Edward Bleiberg (Curator of Egyptian, Classical, and Ancient Middle Eastern...

Round-Crown and Wig inlay. Walters Art Museum. 1920.1976

Round-Crown and Wig inlay

Both of these faïence depictions of royal headdresses date from the late 18th Dynasty to possibly early 19th Dynasty. The first, is likely to have been depicted upon the head of a late 18th Dynasty queen, and next is the round crown, as seen adorning the head of kings such as King Amenhotep III. Lavender...

Henuttaneb, daughter of Amenhotep III & Queen Tiye

Henuttaneb, daughter of Amenhotep III & Queen Tiye

Limestone statuette of Princess Henuttaneb (daughter of Amenhotep III & Queen Tiye) New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1388-1350 B.C. Formerly in the collection of Dominique Mallet, acquired before 1930. Antiquities, Christie’s, London, 30 April 2008, lot 236. Henuttaneb wears the vulture headdress over a bi-partite wig with two pigtails down her back, with traces of...

Red Jasper or Porphyry head of Akhenaten

Red Jasper or Porphyry head of Akhenaten

A head of king Akhenaten made from Egyptian jasper or porphyry. This head of Akhenaten is similar to portraits of the king that we believe come from early in his reign. The less exaggerated features of the soon-to-be “Amarna Period”, this serene, slight smile of the young king looks ahead, as he wears the blue...

Family statue of a man called Wah-Ib "Jeweller of Amun", wife Teri. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria. INV 9233

Family statue of a man called Wah-Ib “Jeweller of Amun”, wife Teri

This family portrait comes from the reign of Amenhotep III. The artistic style of the piece is reminiscent of other pieces from the Late 18th Dynasty era, in which after a lustrous and inspiring reign, Amenhotep III’s lineage took hold with Amenhotep IV (Akhenaten), leading to the eventual collapse of the 18th Dynasty’s Golden Age...