Amarna

Plaster head of Akhenaten

This plaster head of king Akhenaten was discovered within the remnants of the studio of the sculptor Thutmose at Tel el-Amarna (House P 47.02, Room 19). House P 47.02, Room 19, is the same location where the famous painted limestone bust was also discovered. Photographs of both the painted bust of Nefertiti and this plaster...

Nefertiti Statue

This limestone striding figure of Nefertiti was unearthed in the archaeological remnants of the sculptor Thutmose’s workshop, within the remains of the same room (Amarna House P 47.02. Room 19) where the famous bust of the queen was discovered in 1912 by Ludwig Borchardt, at Tel el-Amarna. The figure was discovered in several fragments and...

Statuette of Akhenaten

This painted limestone statuette depicts an Amarna king, most likely, or even most definitely king Akhenaten. He is depicted in typical ‘Amarna’ style, with his rounded hips and chubby belly. Wearing the Blue Crown of War known to the Egyptians as the “Khepresh”, the king stands with his hands by his side in a pleated...

Fragment of stela with Amarna Royal

Fragment of stela with either Akhenaten or Nefertiti seatedNew Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1372-1355 B.C.Tel el-Amarna. House N.50.22.Formerly in Berlin, Ägyptisches Museum. 22264.Now in Kunsthistorisches Museum, Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung, Vienna. Inv. 8038.

Akhenaten in blue

Akhenaten in blue

Egyptian blue, also known as calcium copper silicate (CaCuSi4O10 or CaOCuO(SiO2)4 (calcium copper tetrasilicate)) or cuprorivaite, is a pigment that was used in Ancient Egypt for thousands of years. It is considered to be the first synthetic pigment. It was known to the Romans by the name caeruleum. After the Roman era, Egyptian blue fell...

Monkey's Grooming

Monkey’s Grooming

This small limestone figurine depicts a monkey grooming another, and from the right side a small monkey can be seen grooming another tiny monkey, between the two.The purpose of this figurine is uncertain, it could have been made just as an amusing trinket. However, the Royal Ontario Museum, where this piece now resides, actually proposes...

Quartzite torso of Meketaten

Meketaten was born approximately in Year 4 of Akhenaten’s reign to him and his Great Royal Wife, Nefertiti. She had an elder sister, Meritaten, and four younger sisters: Ankhesenpaaten, Neferneferuaten Tasherit, Neferneferure and Setepenre. Tutankhaten was likely their full brother or half-brother through their father. The first known depiction of Meketaten is on the walls...

Amarna Princess

This small limestone statuette depicts a daughter of king Akhenaten and Nefertiti. She is depicted with a “side lock” of youth, protruding from a cap crown, seemingly made of layered beads. A “side lock” of youth is the modern term coined by Egyptologists to recognize this specific hairstyle, which was often worn by children or...

Relief of Two princesses

Two princesses

This talatat depicts two princesses of king Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti. Their youth is represented by the hairstyle Egyptologist’s have dubbed the ‘side lock of youth’, a plaited strand or strands of hair on an otherwise shaven head or short hairstyle. This piece was found among the foundations of the Pylon of Ramesses II...

Amarna: A Guide to the Ancient City of Akhetaten

Amarna: A Guide to the Ancient City of Akhetaten

“An illustrated cultural guide to the archaeological site of Amarna, the best-preserved pharaonic city in Egypt. Around three thousand years ago, the pharaoh Akhenaten turned his back on Amun, and most of the great gods of Egypt. Abandoning Thebes, he quickly built a grand new city in Middle Egypt, Akhetaten―Horizon of the Aten―devoted exclusively to...