Amarna Period

Fragment of Meritaten from Maru-Aten

Gifted from the Egypt Exploration Society to the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio, United States, this fragmentary piece of alabaster showcases the intricate skill of the artisans of the Amarna age. Despite only a fragment remaining, we can get a true insight into the beauty of the pleated royal linens worn during the New...

Head of Tutankhamun

This indurated limestone head of Tutankhamun, shows the youthful king wearing the khepresh crown, with a cobra uraeus. Upon first glance you may miss it, but what is fascinating is the hand of Amun, sanctifying Tutankhamun. Although statues of Egyptian rulers with deities were common practice, this piece, depicting Tutankhamun with Amun, showcases the rapid...

Plaster face of an elder

Plaster face of an elder

This plaster face of an elderly face was discovered in Tell el-Amarna, the location of king Akhenaten’s experimental capital city of Akhetaten. Within this city was discovered a workshop belonging to the “king’s favourite” sculptor, a man by the name of Thutmose. It was of the remnants of this workshop where the world-famous, objectively breathtaking...

Inlay of a princess

Inlay face of a princess, possibly Meritaten, made from opaque turquoise-blue glassNew Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1351–1334 B.C.Tel el-Amarna.British Museum. EA54264 Meritaten, also spelled Merytaten, Meritaton or Meryetaten (Ancient Egyptian: mrii.t-itn), was an ancient Egyptian royal woman of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt. Her name means “She who is beloved of Aten“; Aten being the...

Life-size quartzite head of Nefertiti

Life-size quartzite head of Nefertiti

This life-size quartzite head of Nefertiti was discovered within the remains of the workshop of the Ancient Egyptian sculptor Thutmose at Amarna. Although unmarked, the resemblance to other portraits of Nefertiti identify her clearly. The head is made of quartzite, but has yet to be sanded to create a smooth finish. The face still has...

Talatat of Kiya usurped by Meritaten

Kiya usurped by Meritaten

This limestone talatat shows a depiction of Queen Kiya, secondary wife of Akhenaten, making an offering of a cone of scented fat to the Aten. It is believed, however, that this piece was later reused and usurped to actually depict Akhenaten’s daughter, with his Great Royal Wife Nefertiti, Meritaten. The reason for this belief is...

Nefertiti smiting - talatat. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 63.260

Nefertiti smiting

These talatats (stone fragments) show an Amarna Period scene of Nefertiti within a kiosk upon a royal barge smiting an enemy of Egypt. Usually this pose would be reserved for the king alone, however, as we can see, Nefertiti is clearly depicted in such a position, representing her status at the time of this images’...

Head of Tutankhamun or Ankhesenamun

Head of Tutankhamun or Ankhesenamun

This plaster face, dating from the reign of Akhenaten or shortly after his reign ended, is thought to represent a child of the king. The British Museum, where this face resides, has the face archived, identifying it with the likeness of either Tutankhamun or his sister-wife Ankhesenamun. Ankhesenamun, was one of the six daughters of...

Round-Crown and Wig inlay. Walters Art Museum. 1920.1976

Round-Crown and Wig inlay

Both of these faïence depictions of royal headdresses date from the late 18th Dynasty to possibly early 19th Dynasty. The first, is likely to have been depicted upon the head of a late 18th Dynasty queen, and next is the round crown, as seen adorning the head of kings such as King Amenhotep III. Lavender...

Alabaster statue of King Seti, once at Egyptian Museum, Cairo, now at the Luxor Musuem. JE 36692 / CG 42139

Statue of Seti I

Once in a weary state, this alabaster masterpiece was discovered dismantled within a cache at Karnak Temple (Luxor, Egypt). It appears that upon the ancient dismantling, the inlaid stones which once filled the eye and eyebrow sockets were removed, as were the likely real and pure golden cuffs that adorned the king’s wrists, placed strategically...