Amarna Period

Plaster face of a man, possibly Ay

This face of a man was discovered within the remnants of the Sculptor Thutmoses’s workshop in Tel el-Amarna. Although unnamed, some scholars propose it may be the face of Ay, who is also thought to be a brother of Queen Tiye and was definitely king after the death of king Tutankhamun. This association of Ay...

Plaster Amarna Royal

This plaster head depicts an Amarna royal, likely a king, and based upon resemblance it is even more likely to be a casting of king Akhenaten. The head is life-size, and measures at 20.5cm long, and 14.5cm wide, with a 13cm depth. If the head is of king Akhenaten, it could be from early in...

Colossal Tutankhamun

This colossal statue of king Tutankhamun is one of two colossal figures of the king discovered at Medinet Habu, within the remnants of the Hypostyle Hall of the Funerary Temple of king Ay and Horemheb. Made of quartzite, this statue stands around 10ft tall. The remnants of paint remain, giving us a clear indication of...

Pet Monkey

Pet Monkey

A pet monkey under the chair of Maia, wife of the dignitary Rij, as seen upon the north-wall of the antechapel within Rij’s tomb. New Kingdom, Late 18th Dynasty-Early 19th Dynasty, c. 1550–1186 B.C. Tomb of Rij, Saqqara.
Now at Neues Museum, Berlin. ÄM 7278

Head of Amarna Royal

Showcasing a clear resemblance to members of the Amarna royal family, it is not hard to see this piece dates from the late 18th Dynasty. Absolute identification of this head is uncertain, but resemblance to Tiye as well as her son king Akhenaten himself, as well as other heads of princesses (daughters of Akhenaten), make...

Amarna cow slaughter

This painted limestone talatat originally came from the dismantled experimental capital of Akhetaten (modern Tel el-Amarna) founded by Akhenaten, but was used as building fodder in Hermopolis, likely during the reign of king Ramesses II. The piece depicts a bald man in a pleated wrapped kilt (shendyt) slaughtering cows. It is possible that the man...

Amenhotep III and Queen Tiye before offering table

Amenhotep III & Queen Tiye receive offerings

This limestone stela dates from after the twelfth regnal year of king Akhenaten, and it depicts king Amenhotep III, and his Great Royal Wife Tiye. The couple sit under the rays of the Aten, before a grand display of nourishing offerings, in the form of vegetation, grains as well as a floral display of lotus...

Statuette of Akhenaten

This painted limestone statuette depicts an Amarna king, most likely, or even most definitely king Akhenaten. He is depicted in typical ‘Amarna’ style, with his rounded hips and chubby belly. Wearing the Blue Crown of War known to the Egyptians as the “Khepresh”, the king stands with his hands by his side in a pleated...

Fragment of stela with Amarna Royal

Fragment of stela with either Akhenaten or Nefertiti seatedNew Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1372-1355 B.C.Tel el-Amarna. House N.50.22.Formerly in Berlin, Ägyptisches Museum. 22264.Now in Kunsthistorisches Museum, Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung, Vienna. Inv. 8038.

Akhenaten in blue

Akhenaten in blue

Egyptian blue, also known as calcium copper silicate (CaCuSi4O10 or CaOCuO(SiO2)4 (calcium copper tetrasilicate)) or cuprorivaite, is a pigment that was used in Ancient Egypt for thousands of years. It is considered to be the first synthetic pigment. It was known to the Romans by the name caeruleum. After the Roman era, Egyptian blue fell...