Akhenaten

Amenhotep III and Queen Tiye before offering table

Amenhotep III & Queen Tiye receive offerings

This limestone stela dates from after the twelfth regnal year of king Akhenaten, and it depicts king Amenhotep III, and his Great Royal Wife Tiye. The couple sit under the rays of the Aten, before a grand display of nourishing offerings, in the form of vegetation, grains as well as a floral display of lotus...

Statuette of Akhenaten

This painted limestone statuette depicts an Amarna king, most likely, or even most definitely king Akhenaten. He is depicted in typical ‘Amarna’ style, with his rounded hips and chubby belly. Wearing the Blue Crown of War known to the Egyptians as the “Khepresh”, the king stands with his hands by his side in a pleated...

Fragment of stela with Amarna Royal

Fragment of stela with either Akhenaten or Nefertiti seatedNew Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1372-1355 B.C.Tel el-Amarna. House N.50.22.Formerly in Berlin, Ägyptisches Museum. 22264.Now in Kunsthistorisches Museum, Ägyptisch-Orientalische Sammlung, Vienna. Inv. 8038.

Akhenaten in blue

Akhenaten in blue

Egyptian blue, also known as calcium copper silicate (CaCuSi4O10 or CaOCuO(SiO2)4 (calcium copper tetrasilicate)) or cuprorivaite, is a pigment that was used in Ancient Egypt for thousands of years. It is considered to be the first synthetic pigment. It was known to the Romans by the name caeruleum. After the Roman era, Egyptian blue fell...

Quartzite torso of Meketaten

Meketaten was born approximately in Year 4 of Akhenaten’s reign to him and his Great Royal Wife, Nefertiti. She had an elder sister, Meritaten, and four younger sisters: Ankhesenpaaten, Neferneferuaten Tasherit, Neferneferure and Setepenre. Tutankhaten was likely their full brother or half-brother through their father. The first known depiction of Meketaten is on the walls...

Fragment of Meritaten from Maru-Aten

Gifted from the Egypt Exploration Society to the Toledo Museum of Art in Ohio, United States, this fragmentary piece of alabaster showcases the intricate skill of the artisans of the Amarna age. Despite only a fragment remaining, we can get a true insight into the beauty of the pleated royal linens worn during the New...

Bust of Akhenaten

Limestone bust of Akhenaten from Tel el-Amarna (ancient Akhetaten) New Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, reign of Akhenaten, c. 1352-1335 B.C. Musée du Louvre. E 11076

Family portrait of Akhenaten, Nefertiti & daughter

Family portrait of Akhenaten, Nefertiti & daughter

Triad family portrait of Akhenaten, Nefertiti and daughter holding handsNew Kingdom, 18th Dynasty, c. 1353-1336 B.C. King Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti are believed to have had at least six daughters together. They were: Meritaten, Meketaten, Ankhesenpaaten (who changed her name Ankhesenamun and became the wife of her half brother Tutankhamun), Neferneferuaten Tasherit, Neferneferure, and...

Mummified skull of Amenhotep III

Mummified skull of Amenhotep III

The mummified skull of Amenhotep III, photographed by Grafton Elliot Smith in 1912. Originally buried in WV22 (Valley of the Kings), Amenhotep III’s mummy was moved in ancient times to Tomb KV35, the tomb of Amenhotep II, which was used by Egyptian priests around the Third Intermediate Period as a royal “mummy” cache (storage). Tomb...

Plaster face of an elder

Plaster face of an elder

This plaster face of an elderly face was discovered in Tell el-Amarna, the location of king Akhenaten’s experimental capital city of Akhetaten. Within this city was discovered a workshop belonging to the “king’s favourite” sculptor, a man by the name of Thutmose. It was of the remnants of this workshop where the world-famous, objectively breathtaking...