5th Dynasty

Woman baking bread

This painted limestone statuette depicting a woman baking bread was discovered at Giza within Tomb G 2415. According to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, where this piece currently resides, the statue was broken in antiquity and was fixed via a wooden peg, holding the base together. If you look closely, you can still see...

The boy Ptahneferti

The boy Ptahneferti

This painted limestone statuette of Ptahneferti (ptHnfrtj) as a boy, was discovered in Giza, Tomb G 2009. Dating from the Old Kingdom’s 5th Dynasty, c. 2465–2323 B.C., stands at 18 cm tall.In Ancient Egypt, children were often represented nude or partially dressed, with one long braided plait falling from the side of their head and...

Head of King Userkaf

Head of King Userkaf

This head of King Userkaf was found in his Sun Temple dedicated by him to the god Re at Abusir. The royal head, wearing the Deshret or the Red Crown of Lower Egypt, is a striking example of the style marking the beginning of the 5th Dynasty. When it was discovered, it was first attributed...

Triad of Rawer

Triad of Rawer

Quartzite triad statue of Rawer; standing, left leg forward, arms along the body, hands closed in fist, same garment, the central figure wearing round plait wig; the two others have long wig. Inscription on the back. Owner of G 8988. Son of Itisen and Hetepheres. Entrance architrave, lintel and facade inscribed for Rawer, identified as...

King Unas being suckled by a goddess

King Unas being suckled by a goddess

Fragment of a relief depicts king Unas being suckled by unidentified goddess. These reliefs are often found in temple complexes and tombs, and they serve as visual representations of the divine nature and legitimacy of the king. The concept of a king being suckled by a goddess is often seen as a metaphorical representation of...

Statue of Ptahshepses as a Scribe

Statue of Ptahshepses as a Scribe

Ptahshepses in this statue is portrayed as a scribe sitting on the ground with his legs crossed. He has a partly unrolled papyrus on his knees, a common “reading scribe” posture in Ancient Egypt. A heart-shaped amulet hangs around his neck with a counterpoise at the back. The head of Ptahshepses is inclined gently toward...

Statue of Nursing Woman

Statue of a Nursing Woman

The nursing woman sits on the ground with one knee raised. Against the hammock of cloth formed by her skirt stretched over her knee she holds a child whose yellow skin indicates she is a girl. With one hand the woman holds the child’s head, while with the other she offers her breast to the...

Statue of Snofru-nefer

Statue of Snofru-nefer, a court official

The statue of Snofru-nefer is a prime example for demonstrating the fundamental principles of the Egyptian sculptor. He was the principal singer and the overseer of amusements at the royal court. The upright posture and the positioning of the arms at a straight angle with the shoulders demonstrate the strict adherence to straight angles. The...

Painted wooden statue of Metjetji

Statue of Metjetji

With titles such as, “Overseer of the Bureau of Tentantry of the Court“, “Overseer of the Office of the Palace of Tenants”, “Liege of the King of the Great Palace”, Metjetji was clearly a wealthy man of elite status. It is believed he worked directly with the king and possibly played an important role in...

Old Kingdom Statue of Raherka and Meresankh

Old Kingdom Statue of Raherka and Meresankh

Painted limestone statue of Raherka and Meresankh. Raherka held high administrative responsibilities. He was an “inspector of scribes of the jackal”. Meresankh’s title was “King’s acquaintance”, which means she had access to the royal palace. The couple is known from their beautiful pair-statue, which is an example of portraiture in Ancient Egypt. The statue is...