Statue of the Vizier Paramessu (Ramesses I) as a Scribe

The statue of Paramessu, who later became King Ramesses I, the founder of the 19th Dynasty, father of King Seti I and grand father of King Ramesses II, shows him in the classic pose of a seated scribe. Statues of this type are intended to depict a great man of letters, not just a mere scribe.

His facial features are calm and serious. Paramessu wears a wavy wig that ends in curls covering his forehead, just above his eyebrows. It flares toward the shoulders and hides the upper part of his ears. His eyes are directed toward the unrolled papyrus on his lap and his hand is in the writing position. His body is wrapped in a long tight kilt, tied under his armpits and covering his crossed legs. His name and titles are engraved around the base.

Statue of the Vizier Paramessu as a Scribe. Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 44863
Statue of the Vizier Paramessu as a Scribe. Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 44863

The cartouche of King Horemheb is engraved on his right shoulder and on the right arm. Paramessu was the vizier and military chief during Horemheb’s reign (ca. 1319-1292 BC) before he gained the throne of Egypt himself.

New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, reign of Ramesses I, ca. 1292-1290 BC. Granite, Karnak Cachette. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 44863

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