Outer Coffin of Khonsu

The coffin of Khonsu was found in the Tomb of Sennedjem (TT1), Khonsu’s father, at Deir el-Medina, West Thebes. This wooden coffin bears decoration related to Chapter 17 of the Book of the Dead on its long sides. On one side Anubis can be seen mummifying the body of Osiris (with whom the deceased is now identified), while Isis and Nephthys kneel at either side. Khonsu and his wife observe in the form of human-headed birds. Two lions can be seen above, with the sun-disc rising over the horizon between them. 

On the opposite side of the coffin, a black-skinned god represents the fertility of the Nile Valley, while Khonsu and his wife sit within a booth in the register below. At either end of the coffin the goddesses Isis, Nephthys, Serket and Neith can be seen.

Outer Coffin of Khonsu
Outer Coffin of Khonsu
Outer Coffin of Khonsu
Detail of the plastered and painted wooden outer coffin of Khonsu
Detail of the plastered and painted wooden outer coffin of Khonsu

Coffins were generally made of wood, metal, stone or pottery. Gold and silver was used on some coffins, but this was generally reserved for kings or royalty. Some Egyptians were also buried with funerary objects. Not all could afford these though.

New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, reign of Ramesses II, ca. 1279-1189 BC. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 27302