Mummy and Coffin of Djed-djehuty-iuef-ankh

Djed-djehuty-iuef-ankh (whose name means ‘The god Thoth says “May he live”’) was a member of a family of priests from the city of Thebes, where he served the warlike god Montu. This spectacular nest of three coffins containing his mummy was found in 1895, together with that of his mother, buried within the grounds of the temple of Deir el-Bahari.

During the 25th Dynasty of Egypt, mummification practices continued to be an important part of the funerary rituals. The process of mummification involved preserving the body through various steps, such as removing internal organs, desiccating the body with natron, and wrapping it in linen bandages.

Mummy and Coffin of Djed-djehuty-iuef-ankh
Mummy and Coffin of Djed-djehuty-iuef-ankh

This was done to ensure the preservation of the deceased’s body for the afterlife, as the ancient Egyptians believed in the concept of an afterlife and the importance of maintaining the physical form.

Mummification was a complex and intricate process that required skilled embalmers and was often accompanied by religious rituals and ceremonies.

During the 25th Dynasty of Egypt, the role of the Priest of Thebes held significant importance. Thebes, located in Upper Egypt, was a major religious and cultural center during this period.

Mummy and Coffin of Djed-djehuty-iuef-ankh
Mummy and Coffin of Djed-djehuty-iuef-ankh

The Priest of Thebes played a crucial role in the religious practices and ceremonies of the time. They were responsible for overseeing the worship of the gods, conducting rituals, and maintaining the temples dedicated to the deities.

The Priest of Thebes held considerable influence and power within the religious hierarchy and often had close ties to the ruling kings. They played a vital role in upholding the religious traditions and beliefs of ancient Egypt during the 25th Dynasty.

Mummy and Coffin of Djed-djehuty-iuef-ankh
Mummy and Coffin of Djed-djehuty-iuef-ankh

Third Intermediate Period, 25th Dynasty, ca. 770–712 BC. Now in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. AN1895.153, 155-156

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