Khopesh Sword of Tutankhamun

The khopesh sword of Tutankhamun is a single piece of bronze divided into three parts. The first part is the hilt, which is black. The second and third parts form the blade. The second part is straight, on the same level as the handle, and is engraved with the figure of a lotus flower with a long stem. The third part is bent to form a curve, and is engraved with a long stripe.

The shape of this sword is the same as the sword held by the figure of the king, depicted on the perforated and gilded wood votive shield that was found in the tomb, and is considered to be ceremonial in purpose.

Khopesh Sword of Tutankhamun
Khopesh Sword of Tutankhamun
Kopesh from the tomb of Tutankhamun
Kopesh from the tomb of Tutankhamun

The Khopesh sword is an Egyptian sickle-sword that evolved from battle axes. A typical khopesh comes this length, though smaller examples also exist. The inside curve of the weapon could be used to trap an opponent’s arm, or to pull an opponent’s shield out of the way.

From the Tomb of Tutankhamun (KV62), Valley of the Kings, West Thebes. Bronze and ebony. Size: L 59.5 cm W 2.3 cm, Handle: L 12.5 cm W 2.1 cm. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 61588