Inside the Tomb of Ramesses IV

After a short reign of about six and a half years (1155-1149 BC), Ramesses IV died and was buried in tomb (KV2) in the Valley of the Kings, West Thebes. His mummy was found in the royal cache of Amenhotep II’s tomb (KV35) in 1898. His chief wife is Queen Duatentopet or Tentopet or Male who was buried in (QV74). His son, Ramesses V, would succeed him to the throne.

In the upper register are two bodies of water, probably versions of the Lake of Fire, guarded by cobras and jackal-headed humans. In the central register is the snake of time Hiririet in a pit, surrounded by water and a mound on which stand the goddesses of the twelve hours of the night, as well as nine followers of Osiris as mummies lying within shrines.

Illustrated Book of Gates
Illustrated Book of Gates. Photo: Sandro Vannini

On the lower register is a procession of twelve gods (on the left) and eleven human figures behind a rearing cobra (on the right) approaching a chapel in which Osiris in the white crown stands on a coiled snake.

Decorative relief depicts the jackal-headed god Anubis
Decorative relief depicts the jackal-headed god Anubis

Decorative relief depicts the jackal-headed god Anubis, who is shown as a standing mummiform figure.

Tomb of Ramesses IV
The Burial Chamber in the Tomb of Ramesses IV

After a short reign of about six and a half years (ca. 1155-1149 BC), Ramesses IV died and was buried in tomb (KV2) in the Valley of the Kings, West Thebes. His mummy was found in the royal cache of Amenhotep II’s tomb (KV35) in 1898. His chief wife is Queen Duatentopet or Tentopet or Male who was buried in (QV74). His son, Ramesses V, would succeed him to the throne.

Detail of a wall painting in the Tomb of Ramesses IV (KV2). New Kingdom, 20th Dynasty, reign of Ramesses IV, ca. 1155-1149 BC. Valley of the Kings, West Thebes.