Head of King Khufu

Colossal head possibly of King Khufu, who became Egypt’s best known pyramid builder, responsible for the Great Pyramid at Giza.

Granite is extremely hard, but the sculptor of this statue was able to give the king’s plump face and small features a softly natural quality, perhaps suggesting the subject’s actual appearance rather than an idealized version. Originally, this fragment surmounted an oversize figure, achieving the same monumental quality as the pyramids being built at this time.

Head of King Khufu
Head of King Khufu

Colossal red granite head of a king in white crown. Broad features, eyes without paint stripes, no uraeus or rearing cobra on crown, no beard. At the back of the neck a line indicating the top of a cloak which suggests that the head may be from a Heb sed statue.

The tip of the crown is missing; also the end of the nose. Small chips from the right eye an upper lip; right ear weathered; minor weathering and chipping elsewhere on the surface but on the whole the preserved potion is in good condition. The break at the neck is irregular.

Old Kingdom, 4th Dynasty, ca. 2613-2494 BC. 21 3/8 x 11 7/16 in. (54.3 x 29 cm). Now in the Brooklyn Museum. 46.167