Artifacts

Ancient Egypt is renowned for its rich and diverse collection of artifacts, which provide valuable insights into the civilization’s history, culture, and daily life. These are just a few examples of the vast array of artifacts that have been unearthed in ancient Egypt. They provide invaluable insights into the beliefs, practices, and achievements of this remarkable civilization.

Plaster head of Akhenaten

This plaster head of king Akhenaten was discovered within the remnants of the studio of the sculptor Thutmose at Tel el-Amarna (House P 47.02, Room 19). House P 47.02, Room 19, is the same location where the famous painted limestone bust was also discovered. Photographs of both the painted bust of Nefertiti and this plaster...

Model of a Slaughter House

Model of a Slaughter House

This model of a slaughter house was discovered in a hidden chamber beside twenty-three other models of boats, gardens, and workshops that led to the royal chief steward Meketre’s rock-cut tomb. Meketre started working for the kings of the 11th Dynasty under King Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II and continued to serve them until the early 12th...

Lion-shaped perfume vase of Tutankhamun

Lion-shaped perfume vase of Tutankhamun

The mythical lion is represented standing with its right leg forward, in contrast to human statues, which have the left leg forward. It shows an aggressive attitude against evil powers; the fangs are bared, the tongue protrudes from the mouth to tease, one foreleg is raised to ward off all evil forces while the other...

Memi & Sabu

This double painted limestone statue depicts the King’s Acquaintances Memi and Sabu. This close up image showcases the craftsmanship of the Old Kingdom’s sculptors. The fine detailing of Memi’s layered wig, which envelops his head in an elaborate circular style, still has traces of black paint upon it, and the individual carvings of each strand...

Imertnebes

This wooden figure of a priestess named Imertnebes was discovered in Thebes and dates from the Middle Kingdom period, c. 1991-1783 B.C. Imertnebes was a high-ranking priestess who bore a title that would eventually be designated for princesses who served as high-priestesses of Amun; “God’s Wife“. Depicted in typical Middle Kingdom fashion, Imertnebes’s figure is...

Mertites & Chennoe

This piece was discovered at Giza, and the inscription indicates that two persons are depicted, a woman named Mertites (who is depicted twice) and a boy named Chennoe (also sometimes written as Shenoe). The relationship between Mertites and Chennoe is not documented upon the piece, however, it is more than likely that they are mother...

Heads of Akhenaten & Nefertiti

These heads, discovered within the remnants of the studio of the sculptor Thutmose at Tel el-Amarna, clearly depict king Akhenaten and his Great Royal Wife Nefertiti. Despite no markings, based upon appearance alone we can almost certainly identify the royal pair. The heads are made of plaster (stucco) and are life-sized. Stucco is applied wet...

Official Mitry

Mitry (formerly spelt “Merti”) was a senior official and province governor. His tomb’s serdab (statue chamber) contained eleven extraordinarily huge wooden statues. Five are in The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collection (26.2.2 – 26.2.6); five, including two wooden scribes, are in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo; and one is at Stockholm’s Medlhavsmuseet. Most of these...

Copulating Couple

This limestone piece, despite damage and missing aspects, depicts a scene of a man and a woman copulating. The man’s phallus is oversized, for symbolism, but the tenderness of the scene showcases an interesting and unique representation of erotic artworks from Ancient Egypt. As the couple lay upon their side facing one another, the man,...

Erotic scene

Fertility was a very important and holy notion for the Egyptians and other ancient cultures. The Egyptian religion and other ancient religions from regions all across the world were essentially almost fully focused on the concept of fertility, with both the philosophy and practices, all coming down to maintaining agriculture, thus survival. In short, fertility...